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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005. i'm not, again not comparing the gravity of the two event but i am comparing the immediate official response over the handling of these events. what i'm also noting is the distinct difference in the media coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. whether it will be an issue a few days from now. pat? >> it could be. what we are seeing, now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake pass, with the marathon and by the way, i have yet to see him in staten island. >> he has not been there yet. >> doesn't it tell you everything, the people you interviewed said. there is a political effort to run the clock out. with the media, like they've done on libya. just like they've hidden the truth about libya, hide the truth about this in the service of obama's campaign. let's get it straight. >> fox was the first camera crew to go to staten island to show this and others in the media have gone. you can't ignore it. >> there is a disconnect, the politician want to say everything is okay. rereality is this afternoon. what will they do, h
it will be sold for a plot of property on the beach. >> did we learn enough from katrina? it seems that people did evacuate, but we didn't have the same problems post-katrina that we did last time in terms of people getting to safety ahead of the storm. from your observation, do you think that's accurate? >> i think all of our professional forecasters -- boy, did they get the right. a week out, they knew this tropical system was going to explode, the way it did take this left hook into new jersey. it has been katrina-esque. the man holding the camera, dwyane scott, was with me in new orleans overnight for that storm. for weeks thereafter, we've been talking about it nonstop today. we may have to rethink some of our shoreline rules and definitions. we've got governors of three states, christie, malloy, cuomo, those three states are talking about a new shoreline and maybe a new normal. maybe we need our folks at the weather channel to tell us, is this a 200-year storm or the start of 200 years worth of storms like this. >> is there a spirit of rebuilding here? do you hear frit the locals? have you b
-- for hurricane isaac and hurricane katrina seven years ago -- both hit, i want to point out here both hit during the week of the homosexual event called southern decadence in new orleans. >> this makes me a bad homo, but i have never even heard of southern decadence. >> it sounds cool. >> we let the straights in. >> i'm in. >> bill: how big of you. >> what it is is that we have a hot line to god, and we're pulling the strings behind the scenes. >> bill: i got it. you know zap him. there are four important ballot measures on the ballot this year, dealing with marriage equality, maryland maine, washington state is the -- well they are all big. >> yeah. >> bill: and then minnesota. what is the difference? >> minnesota's is a constitutional -- anti-gay constitution issue. that would ban it. the other ones are affirmative, right? to maryland and washington both passed in the state legislature marriage equal this year but then anti-gay folks got enough signatures to get enough signatures to put it on the ballot. in maine it was sort of a heart breaker. so everybody is real c
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
and not a problem and that was the same kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005, i'm not again, not comparing the gravity of the two events, but comparing the immediate initial response over the handling of this event and what i'm noting is the distinct difference in the coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. and whether it's going to be an issue a few days from know you. >> it could be. what we're seeing now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake, passed, the marathon. i've yet to see him in staten island. >> neil: i don't know that he's been there yet. >> that's interesting. doesn't that tell you everything that your two people you listened and other lady you interviewed said. the fact of the matter is, there is a political effort to run the clock out and with the media just like they've done on libya, just like they've hidden the truth about libya, it's the hide the truth about this and the service of obama's campaign of the let's get it straight. the president-- >> and the first to take camera crews to go to staten island and show it, fox was. and other media glo
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
than irene's 15.8 billion, last year. but far below katrina's 108-billion dollars and 18-hundred deaths and missing in 2005. unless there is damage to infrastructure, economists say ports and rail yards will make up for lost business quickly. some stock trades, perhaps not--because a light week was expected pending the outcome of the presidential race, a week from now. among insurers, allstate, travelers and chubb corp have the largest market share in sandy's path. corelogic, estimates it includes 284,000 homes worth $88-billion dollars. economists are mixed on whether the storm's impact will affect fourth- quarter g-d-p. mark vitner, senior economist with wells fargo securities says it depends how much is shut down and for how long. mark zandi at moody's analytics says the storm may cause spikes in economic activity--repairing and rebuilding. depsite the storm-- the government is expected to report unemployment numbers for october this friday. phone companies along the east coast are preparing for the likelihood of overtaxed communication infrastructure during hurricane sandy. at&t is
associated with the storm. point of reference, hurricane katrina, around $80 billion of damage alone with another $80 billion in economic damage in the aftermath of katrina. so 20 right now for damage in new york, plus another 20, 25 economic activity. i think those numbers will go substantially higher when they really find out. >> steve: plus there are so many houses they haven't been able to get to. the barrier islands south on the jersey shore, people haven't been able to get there because they were essentially washed out. >> gretchen: the interesting thing about politics relating to the storms is what is the right move for politicians, especially when we're six days away from a monumental presidential election? remember the scathing interpretation that president bush got with regard to hurricane katrina. so what is the right response? the president has to come and has to survey the situation, so what should mitt romney do? he's our -- can you imagine the discussions going on inside these camps about what is the right tone? what looks correct? >> eric: i hate to do this, but i rem
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
far in advance. >> have you covered many hurricane, katrina and isaac. compare, if you can, for us, some of the images you are seeing of sandy and images that you yourself took from those two storms? >> well, katrina was a fascinating experience, very destructive and the biggest storm i think i have seen, certainly the most destructive hurricane. i was -- dicover isaac a few months ago and irene in new york city. people are learning very quickly, the power of water. it doesn't sound that dramatic. but, boy, when you see it energized and pushed up the way sandy was, it's an awakening. >> we have had at least 69 deaths reported from sandy, so far from when it touched down in the cribbia, to here across the east coast. what about the dangers of the storms? you personally? have you ever experienced close calls? >> hurricane charlie in 2004, intensified unexpectedly and turned and came into the ponte gorda area in florida and nearly killed my partner, greg, a meteorologist and myself. i have learned to be extra careful. i was very satisfied to see how much warning was given regarding sa
just a few moments ago that this is similar to what we saw during katrina. >> that's right. hard to grasp. >> homes on fire. >> and then you've got homes on fire. you saw it in new orleans with katrina. these just spontaneous explosions involving homes. and unfortunately, you've got all this water, and firefighters and first responders can't get that water -- >> yeah. to use it to put -- >> to put on the fire. it's a dangerous situation for them. and this is exactly what the mayor was trying to warn people about. don't put your first responders in danger. but this is the situation here. we're going to have much more of our continuing coverage of this superstorm. next. cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? 100% new. 100% mmm... wow, that is mmm... it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calori
the florida coast. we got a lot of their grain from katrina. but all of the storms before, we were affected by many of those. we are 100 miles and the coast. you know what i am saying it? i think it is global warming. it could be other things and stuff. but the way the pollution and stuff is affecting the world -- there you can see different changes and stuff. that is what i want to say. host: this also from the wall street journal about transportation. riders took a 5 billion trips and public systems and washington, d.c., philadelphia, boston, jersey and the greater new york city area. scena. go ahead. caller: i am living in new york. and this is an economy issue. i am looking across the street and new jersey is deadlocked. i look downtown and it is blacked out. all of these people cannot go to work today. their businesses are closed. there are people scrambling. my friends are calling and asking where can i get food? this is a big issue. $20 billion is easily going to be the cost of this. it is all about the economy. we can get more than enough energy. and you wouldn't be facing climate c
in new orleans right after hurricane katrina. he didn't want to get in the way of some of the cleanup. of course that disaster response didn't go as well as it looks like president obama is handling the response happening this time. but there is the danger dealing with secret service logistics at a time when regular logistics, just living every day life, becomes incredibly hard. >> i think it's worth pointing out certainly the obama campaign probably didn't imagine the extent. warmth of the words that chris christie has for the president, but mitt romney held his disaster relief event in ohio yesterday. the question that dogged him that he would not answer was about fema. take a listen. >> governor, what should fema's role be? governor, would you eliminate fema if you were president? >> well, it's either 11 or 14 times, depending on whose count you believe. the campaign released a statement saying that romney would not abolish fema but, quote, governor romney believes that states should be in charge of emergency management in responding to storms and other natural disasters in their j
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
to katrina and crazy storms like that and just amazing and i mean we weren't kidding when we were saying five to seven days, may be two weeks for some people and i know everyone went to the grocery stores and grabbed whatever they could. the way i've seen it, it plays out, the first day is interesting. you don't have power. the second day you start to get a little annoyed as you have no more ice and things start to go bad, day three, four and five, people just start getting angry and it's not fun and it gets ugly in a hurry. >> let me ask you just really quickly because the storm is continuing to move and i got this update on the potential impact in the midwest. chicago lake shore flood warning, high winds in indiana, extreme high winds in northwest ohio. >> damage in cleveland yesterday. >> 23,000 without power in michigan. a village in wisconsin. evacuated at least partially due to sandy. how long are we going to continue to feel the effects of sandy. >> a little bit in those areas but not as bad as yesterday and people saying lake erie was at the highest levels of off of cleveland they've
or on your house some way so we know where you are. very reminiscent of what we saw in katrina. the good news is the vast majority of people who were told to evacuate did evacuate so you didn't have as many trapped people, as you might have expected, had they not done so. two people dead and one man who is still believed to be missing. savannah? >> katy tur in stonington, connecticut this morning. thank you. >> let's go to al roker on point pleasant beach along the jersey shore. al, what's the weather like there, first of all? >> it's still windy, matt, and we're getting bands of rain. let me show you something down philadelphia avenue. you see there's a lot of flooding, and folks walking through that standing water. do not do that. because you don't know what's in there. from a biohazard standpoint, from a debris standpoint, from live wires. there was a woman electrocuted in new york city walking through a puddle. do not do that. so -- but, again, we are talking about the remnants of sandy still hanging around for at least another 24 to 36 hour. as we take a look at the "today" map, in the n
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
. and if you don't, there's a disaster. let's just look at what happened at hurricane katrina. >> yeah. >> let's look at what happened to hurricane katrina. you know what, though? again this is part of a bigger problem with mitt romney right now and republicans and democrats that are afraid to talk about how you really save this country and tackle the debt. instead, they talked about silly things like cutting fema, cutting big bird or saying we're going to take care of all of our problems by raising some taxes on rich people. instead of talking about saving this country for the next generation. >> and also not being honest about defense. >> and both sides not being honest about defense. >> okay. thank you. >> how's that? >> good. >> i don't define fema as quote big government. >> right. >> i define entitlement programs by their numbers that are going to cripple us as, quote, big government. >> "wall street journal," barack obama -- when the history of this administration is written, maybe someone will note the difference. here is that man who promised a transformative presidency, and it amount
officiales to set aside partisan differences. when it's botched as it was in the wake of hurricane katrina. they both graps these principles as they toured the shore. -- >> >> follow today east "washington journal" in the video library at cspan.org. live coverage from doswell virginia on c-span. >> i see there are some really young people and others a little bit older but younger. this election is for you, to make sure you have the same opportunities to catch your dream that we had growing up. [applause] and unlike my opponent who wants to be president obama senator, i want to be virginia's senator. [applause] we are so very fortunate to have here in virginia a governor who is leading a come back in the common wealth of virginia. [applause] we need leaders -- what we did, bob you were in the legislature and so was eric at the time. the democrats controlled the general assembly but we cut taxes and made our streets safer, higher ack demics in our schools and over 3,000 jobs were created in those four years. mitt romney was governor of massachusetts also with a democratic legislature and wha
after hurricane katrina. >> many others have been dispatched from illinois to share what they learned from katrina several years ago. >> reporter: how much water do we need to pump out? >> our estimates at this point in time are 300 to 400 million gallons of water. and it's growing. >> reporter: and even though there's not as much overall as there was in new orleans, he says the job in new york is much more difficult. >> it's not the amount of water that's the problem, it's where it is. >> it's where it is, yeah. >> and where it is is underground in miles and miles of subway and road tunnels. >> some of those tunnels are up to 2 miles long. and the only points into them is at each end. and that requires us to have some pumping capabilities that perhaps reach 1/2 mile to a mile long. >> another problem, the age of the tunnels. new york's subway system is over 100 years old. >> some places we could probably pump out quicker, but we don't want to collapse the tunnel. >> the next challenge, where to pump all that water. >> largely mostly sea water. right now we're working on, it'll get pu
president obama and hurricane sandy and president bush and hurricane katrina. that may happen. >> bill: yeah, but i don't think that's going to happen. it's retail politics now. the factor has, i have spoken at the highest levels with the romney campaign and the obama campaign. i said hey, listen, you have got to do an interview with me. it will be a worldwide event. everybody will be watching it. it will be on the internet. you know, this is something you have got to do. they basically say well, that's the word they used that's intriguing. that means he you don't have a chance in hell. intriguing means it is not going to happen. i understand president obama he would have to answer questions about lynn i can't. not -- libya. it's not going to be brian williams here. is he not going to do it because of that i can't understand why mitt romney is not doing it because mitt romney has a story to tell. in my opinion, he has a story to tell. but i think what the strategy is on the romney campaign is to retail it in ohio, virginia, florida, colorado, and nevada real strong and then we have the elect
doesn't have a hurricane katrina response, there's going to be some rallying effect whenever there's a national crisis. this seems to have benefitted the president. he hasn't made any obvious mistakes. now, of course, there's still a bit of time, but i think by the time people become disenchanted with the response, that'll be sometime after the election day. so it does appear that mother nature is voting democratic this year. >> well, the images of the president and chris christie have been everywhere. of course, christie has been very outspoken as the rnc keynote speaker. he describes obama as, quote, blindly walking around the white house looking for a clue. i think there was a bit of a love fest between him and the president yesterday. let me play some of that. >> we spent a significant afternoon together surveying the damage up and down the new jersey coastline. so i want to thank him for that. he has worked incredibly closely with me since before the storm hit. i think this is our sixth conversation since the weekend. >> at the top of my list, i have to say governor christie,
, reminds me of the hospital stories we heard in katrina and new orleans there must have been patients on ventilators that had to be manually kept alive and getting babies out of the nicu in the dead of night, when the power has gone out. i can't imagine how difficult that was. >> it reminded me very much of my time in new orleans after katrina. the adults, it was interesting, the adults on respirators, they batteries. they were brought down, some of them 15 flights of stairs on respirators with batteries. for some reason the neonatal -- the little newborn babies, their respirators did not have babies. doctors or nurses had to do bagging, where the doctors, the nurse squeezes air right into the baby's lungs so they're walking nine flights down from the nicu, while the whole time squeezing air into the babies' lungs. >> as far as you know, no fatalities. >> as far as we know, all is doing well. some people right now, anderson are asking the question, why didn't they evacuate sooner. i think that's a question that is going to be talked about at nyu for a while now. >> yeah. certainly the
barbour model in mississippi after the katrina disaster. he took that disaster and used the opportunity to basically rebuild some of those communities. it takes planning. it takes courage and leadership. i, in fact i suspect you will find in both those states with the governors. bill: that is great example. thanks for bringing that to light. let's bring to what fox news was reporting late last night with regard to libya. a big turn now. now we have this letter that was september out a couple weeks before the attack in benghazi which clearly showed the presence of al qaeda training camps in the town of benghazi. there was a lot of concern about this. where are you on this story today? >> well i think there's a huge gap between what happened and what the administration's told us. only the president can fill the gap with the truth and at the end of the day i think there is it lesz son to be learned and perhaps passed onto the kids. we had seals to ran to the ambassador's aid, in running to his aid they gave their lives. we have an administration that is running from the ambassador, perhaps
. joining us now to talk about this is dr. erwin redlenner, he has studied how hospitals handled katrina. he knows everything, really, about disaster preparedness. and doctor, i have to ask you this. we've seen a lot of businesses, big businesses like goldman sachs, big buildings downtown on generator power. they're up and running. why not a hospital? >> well, it's not clear why not a hospital. and one of the problems here is initially, years ago, we had generators in the basements of hospitals, which is obviously something that doesn't really work, because when they get flooded, the generators go out. so they moved the generators up to higher elevations, but leave the fuel pumps down in the basement. and those fuel pumps are susceptible to flooding. it's just a detail that turns the out to be extraordinarily important when the time comes to actually use those generators. >> seems like a crucial detail right now. the president of new york city is helping the hospital corporation, asked by cnn's erin burnett last night, if hospitals were ready for this. let's listen to his answer. >> well, th
with andrew which damaged his political career, it was damaged. of course george w. bush in 2005 with katrina. many people in the bush white house cite that was the low point of his presidency. a lot of dangers also, a lot of political opportunities. >> let's get practical. early voting is happening in these states. maryland cancelled early voting for the day. how much of an impact is that especially for the obama campaign is very much -- >> they are dependent on it, talking about it, counting on it. it does have an impact. it moves romney into an awkward situation. anything he does looks blatantly political or needy he's not in the equation when the country is under siege from a massive storm. >> the president of the united states went to the fema command center which by the way was it cynical or maybe the people running the campaign said we need to get him there. the president was doing what presidents do. what does mitt romney do? >> real quickly this close to the election does it matter if they got to cancel these rallies and what about their ad? if you're wall to wall coverage in these m
the army corps of engineers to help. the same group brought into new orleans after hurricane katrina. >> we expect it to be a challenging engineering problem and getting all that storm surge back out and up and running again will take some time and engineering talent and a lot of will power. >> reporter: also need electric power, something 323,000 customers in new york city are still without. workers are pumping around the clock to remove sea water from underground equipment. but dark sky lines and dangerous intersections will be the new normal in lower manhattan and some parts of the outer boroughs for a while longer. utility companies say it might be a week before power is fully restored. city buses will resume full service today and to help new york city get moving again those buses will be operating free of charge. jfk airport resumes limited service today but as far as laguardia goes no word on when laguardia airport might open. >> thank you. much more than water damage in new york city. there was a devastating fire on the rockaway peninsula where much of the neighborhood burned down e
't iraq. it wasn't wmds. it wasn't the horror of all of that. it was katrina and being caught sleeping and feeling like they had abandoned people in new orleans. it impacted them in a deeply personal way. these -- obviously people's lives are on the line here, too, but it also -- it's a sign of leadership. >> there is no pollster in the world who can get at the feelings, the emotions, of someone, a family, who has lost power for three or four days. what does that do to this election? that kind of emotional wild card. there's no way of telling what people feel or who they get angry at. >> one thing the president benefits from, i think, because again, i don't think the white house is going to mess this up. i bet you $10,000, they've got in the tri-state area, three extraordinarily aggressive governors, two democrats, one republican. but chris christie -- >> good way of putting it. >> cuomo and malloy is going to be very aggressive and work very close with the president and the white house because they are concerned about the people, not just the politics of it, they're concerned about th
that came into the economy from federal payments and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion. again, it took a long time to rebuild. what i would say is the initial impact very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want to focus on that. not to be insensitive to what people are dealing with, but there are certain sectors of the economy that will benefit, i would assume, the construction industry to start with, one. >> yes. in hurricane andrew in 1992 the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida and that raised the price across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i have seen the gross domestic product really jump off of a hurricane. this could be like that. that's how big this one might end up being. >> and very quickly, i'm sure you had heard rumors, re
, very surprised. i have been through a few in my career between rita, katrina, and some other ones over my career, but i have never seen one that came with this type of intensity this quick and that's moving this slow. this is a little different for us, and we've been making proper precautions to make sure we were set for this type of storm. >> absolutely. lieutenant, thanks again. appreciate your time. suzanne, i had a chance to talk to some people as i was coming in who were getting out of here, families just, you know, it's not safe, so they're at hotels and basically they're making a family event out of it. they want to be safe. they are cuddled in lobbies watching smuf our coverage as we speak. >> mike, we appreciate it. i know your mike -- it's hard to hear you there. if you kshgs just follow-up on whether or not that boardwalk is actually collapsed or not. i know there are conflicting reports about what the state of the boardwalk is it. we'll get back to you as soon as we can clear up some of that sound a little bit, and, of course, you knowing, the presidential election -- we're
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)